Open vStorage High Availability (HA)

Last week I received an interesting question from a customer:

What about High-Availability (HA)? How does Open vStorage protect against failures?

This customer was right to ask that question. In case you run a large scale, multi-petabyte storage cluster, HA should be one of your key concerns. Downtime in such a cluster doesn’t only lead to production loss but might be a real PR disaster or even lead to foreclosure. When end-customers start leaving your service, it can become a slippery slope and before you are aware there is no customer left on your cluster. Hence, asking the HA question beforehand is a best practice for every storage engineer challenged with doing a due diligence of a new storage technology. Over the past few years we already devoted a lot of words to Open vStorage HA so I thought it was time for a summary.

In this blog post I will discuss the different HA scenarios starting from top (the edge) to bottom (the ASD).

The Edge

To start an Edge block device, you need to pass the IP and port of a Storage Router with the vPool of the vDisk. On initial connection the Storage Router will return to the Edge a list of fail-over Storage Routers. The Edge caches this information and switches automatically to another Storage Router in case it can’t communicate with the Storage Router for 15 seconds.
Periodically the Edge also asks the Storage Router to which Storage Router it should connect. This way the Storage Router can instruct the Edge to connect to another Storage Router, for example because the original Storage Router will be shut down.
For more details, check the following blog post about Edge HA.

The Storage Router

The Storage Router also has multiple HA features for the data path. As a vDisk can only be active and owned by a single Volume Driver, the block to object conversion process of the Storage Router, a mechanism is in place to make sure the ownership of the vDisks can be handed over (happy path) or stolen (unhappy path) by another Storage Router. Once the ownership is transferred the volume is started on the new Storage Router and IO requests can be processed. In case the old Storage Router would still try to write to the backend, fencing will kick in which prevents data to be stored on the backend.
The ALBA proxy is responsible for encrypting, compressing and erasure code the Storage Container Objects (SCOs) coming from the Volume Driver and sending the fragments to the ASD processes on the SSD/SATA disks. Each Storage Router also has multiple proxies and can switch between these proxies in cases of issues and timeouts.

The ALBA Backend

An ALBA backend typically consist out of a multiple physical disks across multiple servers. The proxies generate redundant parity fragments via erasure coding which are stored across all devices of the backend. As a result, a device or even a complete server failure doesn’t lead to data loss. On top, backends can be recursively composed. Let’s take as example the case where you have 3 data centers. One could create a (local) backend containing the disks of each data center and create a (global) backend on top of these these (local) backends. Data could for example be replicated 3 times, one copy in each data center, and erasure coded within the data center for storage efficiency. Using this approach a data center outage wouldn’t cause any data loss.

The management path HA

The previous sections of this blog post discussed the HA features of the data path. The management path is also high available. The GUI and API can be reached from all master nodes in the cluster. The metadata is also stored redundantly and is spread across multiple nodes or even data centers. Open vStorage has 2 types of metadata: the volume metadata and the backend metadata. The volume metadata is stored in a networked RocksDB using a master-slave concept. More information about that can be found here and in a video here.
The backend metadata is stored in our own, in-house developed, always consistent key-value store named Arakoon. More info on Arakoon can be found here.

That’s in a nutshell how Open vStorage makes sure a disk, server or data center disaster doesn’t lead to storage downtime.

About the Author
Wim Provoost
Product Manager Open vStorage.